Skip to main content

Recently added items

Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

(History Article)
The Mi’kmaq occupied this land centuries before the first Europeans arrived and were probably the first Native Americans to have regular contact with Europeans.This may have occurred as early as theeleventh century with the early Viking settlements on the coast of North America.The Mi’kmaq were skilled hunter-gatherers, attuned to the shifting, seasonal resources of the area and were noted for their fishing skills and their distinctive birch bark canoes that were capable of crossing open water.
(History Article)
The earliest recording of the Béchervaise name is that of Colinus of St. Laurent 1331 -- the first member of the family appearing in Jersey records.
(History Article)
Narcisse Cyr was very important in the lumbering industry in the Cascapedia Bay area, owning and operating three mills during the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s.
(History Article)
The Meigs Pulpwood Co. Ltd. is a name that is no longer remembered in this area, although this company did participate in the local lumber industry for a short time in the early 1900s.
(History Article)
Just before the turn of thetwentieth century, three Fallow brothers from New Richmond Station (then called New Richmond Centre) -- George (Geordie), John and James -- formed the Fallow Lumber Company and went into the lumbering business. They purchased land on a branch of the Little Cascapedia River in Chaleurs and built a new sawmill which began operations about 1897.
(History Article)
In 1890, a companywas formed under the name of Cascapedia Manufacturing and Trading Company by Senator William C. Edwards. Angus MacLean joined Sen. Edwards about 1904. Some years earlier Sen. Edwards purchased 659 square miles of limits on the Grand and Little Cascapedia Rivers, to which he added another 558square miles in 1907, which he acquired from Robitaille.
(History Article)
Published by the Association of Gravestone Studies (AGS)Pamphlets, $2.50 to $4.50 each (plus shipping)
(History Article)
You don't see many hobos around the Coast today, but when I was a young girl, there were plenty of them in Shigawake. They would carry a stick with a bag tied to the end of it, just like they do in the movies; filled with clothing or something to eat. The hobos would travel back and forth along the Coast, some by train, and others by foot. Most of them would "ride the rails" as they say. This meant that they would hitch a ride on the train, hiding either underneath or on top or even inside the boxcars. The hobos that we saw traveled the roads.
(History Article)
Our home was the gathering place in the community. We were one of the first ones in Little Pabos to have a radio. I remember when the Lone Ranger would come on. My grandfather, who was in his eighties at the time, would come and find us to let us know that the program would be on shortly.
(History Article)
When the ice was thick enough to haul wood across, the lake would become our rink for skating and hockey.We used to play hockey from the minute we cleared the snow off to the minute the ice started to crack and melt.We had to have a rink for the boys and a rink for the girls because the girls wanted nothing to do with hockey.All they did was complain about us playing hockey all the time, so we made them a rink of their own where they could skate and we could play hockey in peace.
(History Article)
When we were teenagers, we’d hang out at the covered bridge in Wakeham. We would sit on the side of the bridge and talk and share chocolate bars. There were always several couples hanging out and sharing jokes or cuddling under the covered bridge. At the end of the night, we’d walk home together. We’d go to the bridge two, maybe three times a week.
(History Article)
We may not have had much as kids growing up in Douglastown, but the one thing we did have was a lot of fun. We used to play cards and board games, but the highlight of our days was going to the post office.We kids always used to hang out at the post office.I will never forget Mr. Kennedy, the postmaster we had for years and years.He was as nasty as anything; mad as a rooster. We would go all over the place on the bikes.
(History Article)
My fondest memories of living on Bonaventure Island are the beautiful beaches. Bonaventure Island has some of the most beautiful beaches I have ever seen. I remember when I was a child I was told to stay away from the cliffs, as they were very, very steep and my aunt and uncle were afraid that I might fall off or that something terrible might happen to me. They were very protective of me.
(History Article)
I was just a young fellow of ten years of age when I remember my mother saying that it was time for me to accompany my father in the woods trappin’. She did not like the fact that he would be two weeks alone out in the woods without anyone around to look out for him. The woods can be a dangerous place for a fella on his own. If anything ever happened back there in the woods, he would be in bad shape! My daddy would go 50 miles back into the woods – that’s right-50 miles on foot into the woods. So after I had done about three years of school, I quit and headed into the woods with my daddy.
(History Article)
We grew up right here in York. Oh yes, there was a number of us boys grew up here together. The Stewart boys and the Jones boys. As young fellows in the summertime, we spent a lot of our time in the water, down there on the shores of York River. York Bay you might call it. Swimming and wading and playing down on the beach. Then we used to do work with our mother and father-sometimes a little in the garden, haymaking would come up and milking and stable work. Hunting and fishing too, every boy did that.
(History Article)
The publication of our book, Our Gaspé Home, Now and Forever, created a whirlwind of excitement in our halls and classrooms. It was not, however, our only triumph.
(History Article)
My father was a lighthouse keeper from 1925 to 1940. We all had chores as children and it was my responsibility to keep the globe on the lighthouse lantern clean so that the boats could see the light coming in to the harbour and not go aground. Every morning I would go down to the lighthouse with my dad.
(History Article)
Tears roll down Carl Bond's cheeks as he stands outside the 96-year-old general store overlooking the glittering bay where Perce Rock looms in the distance. The door is locked, and, for the first time in 38 years, store manager Bond no longer has the key. "It's a whole lifetime all gone down to nothing," says Bond, 55, who started working here at age 16. The Robin store - owned by Robin, Jones and Whitman, Canada's oldest retailer after the Hudson's Bay Co. - was where villagers bought everything from sugar to septic tanks, cashed their cheques and gathered for gossip.
(History Article)
Forillon has been inhabited for a long time. Nine thousand years ago, prehistoric peoples camped on the capes lining the point, the marine terraces of the Anse au Griffon Valley and Penouille Point. For centuries, the coves and pebbled beaches of the Gaspé Cape in Petit-Gaspé had attracted the Micmacs, the first inhabitants of Gaspé, seasonal and sedentary fishers. The largest coves, such as Anse aux Sauvages, Saint-Georges Cove and Grande-Grave had villages established near them. Smaller coves welcomed family settlements.
(History Article)
Aviation pioneer Jacques de Lesseps, or the Comte de Lesseps, as he is often known, was the eldest son of Ferdinand de Lesseps, the French diplomat who was behind the Suez Canal.
(History Article)
One of the premier architectural landmarks along the south Gaspe Coast (Route 132) is the remarkable LeGrand Hotel in Port Daniel. Built in 1899 by Alfred Dumaresq LeGrand, a native of Jersey, the building is as fine an example of Second Empire architecture as one is likely to find in this part of the world.
(History Article)
One of the finest examples of mid-nineteenth century architecture on the Gaspé Coast is the mansion known as Hamilton Manor.
(History Article)
Foreword: Though the name of Frederick James Richmond continues to be recalled annually to the youth of Gaspé through the award of the Richmond scholarships, established by his brother George, the life and influence of this remarkable Gaspesian has faded with time and the passing away of those who knew him personally. Sweeping social changes have so altered the society of his native town of Gaspé that much of its earlier English heritage may soon be forgotten.
(History Article)
In October 1675, more than three centuries ago, Father Chrestien Le Clercq, a missionary of the Recollet or Reformed Franciscian Order of France, landed at Percé in Gaspesia.